Readers And Writers Blog, Sid Leavitt

New Works at Readers & Writers Blog

Yesterday marked the last regular new entry for awhile at Sid Leavitt’s Readers and Writers Blog (although he will be “filing an entry every now and then.”) New works posted in that entry include:

* The remaining nine chapters of Ann M. Pino’s Steal Tomorrow.

* A poem, And Don’t Ya Know, by Laura Elliot.

* A complete rewrite of J. Cafesin’s Disconnected.

All excellent stuff there, so check ’em out! The link to R&W Blog will remain in my blogroll. If you’re ever looking for something good to read, don’t forget to check Sid’s archived works. You won’t be sorry.

Readers And Writers Blog, Sid Leavitt

New Works at Readers & Writers Blog

Yesterday marked the last regular new entry for awhile at Sid Leavitt’s Readers and Writers Blog (although he will be “filing an entry every now and then.”) New works posted in that entry include:

* The remaining nine chapters of Ann M. Pino’s Steal Tomorrow.

* A poem, And Don’t Ya Know, by Laura Elliot.

* A complete rewrite of J. Cafesin’s Disconnected.

All excellent stuff there, so check ’em out! The link to R&W Blog will remain in my blogroll. If you’re ever looking for something good to read, don’t forget to check Sid’s archived works. You won’t be sorry.

Readers And Writers Blog, Red Sox, Sid Leavitt, waiting for spring

All good things must come to an end

I’m not talking about the heartbreaking loss of my beloved Red Sox to the team-that-shall-not-be-named, nor to the horrifying possiblity that Mr. Jason Varitek–now officially a free agent–may not be back with the Sox next year (please, please please sign the man, Theo).

No, I’m talking about Waiting For Spring‘s serialization at Sid Leavitt’s Readers and Writers Blog. That’s right…the final two chapters were posted there yesterday.

I can’t begin to express my gratitude to Sid for giving Waiting For Spring such a fine home alongside so many amazing books, short stories, and poems. He announced yesterday that he’s taking a temporary break from posting new entries after next week, but the site will remain up, along with “The Works” library. (Check it out: Non Fiction, Fiction, Poetry.) Waiting For Spring will remain there as well should you wish to read it.

In the meantime, also posted this week: chapters 18 and 19 of Ann M. Pino’s Steal Tomorrow.

Readers And Writers Blog, Red Sox, Sid Leavitt, waiting for spring

All good things must come to an end

I’m not talking about the heartbreaking loss of my beloved Red Sox to the team-that-shall-not-be-named, nor to the horrifying possiblity that Mr. Jason Varitek–now officially a free agent–may not be back with the Sox next year (please, please please sign the man, Theo).

No, I’m talking about Waiting For Spring‘s serialization at Sid Leavitt’s Readers and Writers Blog. That’s right…the final two chapters were posted there yesterday.

I can’t begin to express my gratitude to Sid for giving Waiting For Spring such a fine home alongside so many amazing books, short stories, and poems. He announced yesterday that he’s taking a temporary break from posting new entries after next week, but the site will remain up, along with “The Works” library. (Check it out: Non Fiction, Fiction, Poetry.) Waiting For Spring will remain there as well should you wish to read it.

In the meantime, also posted this week: chapters 18 and 19 of Ann M. Pino’s Steal Tomorrow.

Readers And Writers Blog, Sid Leavitt, waiting for spring, writing

New Works

Readers & Writers blog is chock fulla new stuff. Steal Tomorrow (my blog buddy Bunnygirl‘s post-apocalyptic novel, begins its serialization today; Tim Hulings’ short story Parcul Centru is featured; as well as chapter 25 of Waiting for Spring.

Sid Leavitt has also announced that, beginning this week, R&W Blog will post new material only on Sundays (two chapters at a time for novel serializations) so he can take some well-deserved time for himself during the week. I know I’m not speaking for just myself when I send a big THANK YOU over to him for all his hard work, and for his kindness in giving so many writers a home. When you click over there next, be sure to check out the Works section. It’s quite a library…

Adrift in America, book review, Readers And Writers Blog, Sid Leavitt

Visa bills, nectarines, and bituminous concrete

I don’t know if you’ve ever worked nights before. If you have, you know what I mean when I say my brain feels like cottage cheese a good portion of the week; namely during the day, when Cottage Cheese Brain is exactly what I don’t need. Important phone calls are not returned, car maintainence appointments are forgotten, and toenails frequently go unclipped for weeks at a time. In short my life, like my panty hose, is coming apart at the seams. The toe seams.

To combat this trend, last night I made a decision that goes against my nature. I decided to make a list. Not the kind that reminds me of all the bad things I’ve done that need to be set straight. No, the kind that reminds me of all of the necessary things I keep forgetting to do so I can keep my life straight. For example:

– Pay your Visa bill, you idiot!!!!!! It was due last Thursday!!!!!! Late fees!!!! Ack!!!!!

– There’s a bag of nectarines in the back of the crisper. It’s been there forever. Throw it way.

– You finished Adrift in America last week. You forgot to blog about it.

Now that my overdue Visa bill and soupy nectarines have been taken care of, it’s time to tell you guys about Sid Leavitt’s Adrift in America, a “diary of a minimalist mariner.”

In the late 1980s, Mr. Leavitt–having been unceremoniously let go from his editor’s job at a Portland, Maine newsaper–sold his house and most of his belongings, bought a truck, and set off to see America. It wasn’t wanderlust that inspired him…at least not mostly. He hit the road because he wanted to live deliberately; to live frugally and suck out all the bituminous concrete of life. He was looking for freedom, too, the kind that meant “being able to say ‘Fuck you’ to your boss and be out of town 10 minutes later with everything you own.” Oh, to know such freedom! But what I love most about this book is that we get a glimpse of everyday America. Not the touristy, post card America; but real towns with real people. The ones we overlook when we’re on vacation.

So check it out. It’s posted at Readers and Writers Blog, here by chapters and here in its entirety.

Now, if you’ll excuse me, I have to go clip my toenails.