“Six-Hundred Hours of a Life”


600hours cover I just finished reading “Six-Hundred Hours of a Life” by Craig Lancaster, which chronicles 25 days (or 600 hours) in the life of Edward Stanton, a man with OCD and Aspergers syndrome. I can’t recommend it highly enough. It’s funny and touching and SO well written. I sat at my screen for over five hours and read it in one sitting. (I did get up once to go pee.)

 It had been on my To Be Read list for a few weeks, as it was one of the six books nominated for LLBookReview’s 100th book to be reviewed* but I bumped it to the top of the list after I read a review of it. I am SO glad I did.

It’s available on Smashwords in a variety of ebook formats (including PDF – which is how I read it – and Kindle/.mobi). It’s normally $4.99, but it’s part of Smashwords 50% off promotion, so you can get it for $2.50.  Or you can get it from Amazon.com.

Synopsis: Edward doesn’t trust anything he can’t verify. He lives in solitude in a house in Billings, Montana, and sticks to the few things he can rely on: the data he keeps, and his trusty videotaped episodes of the ’60s cop show Dragnet. But over the course of 25 days — 600 hours — events begin to draw Edward out and force him to confront a question: Can he deal with life on its terms?

Click here to read the review that prompted me to bump it to the top of my TBR list. I hope you all will do the same.

* Voting ended July 4th at midnight. Micha Berman’s Permanent Passenger won. I’ll post more about that later. 🙂

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About R.J. Keller

R. J. Keller is the author of Waiting For Spring. An avid independent movie enthusiast, she was Managing Editor of The Movie Fanatic website and created episodes of the writer-centric YouTube series, Inside The Writers' Studio, with author Kristen Tsetsi. She co-hosted Book Chatter with Stacey Cochran from 2011-2014. She lives in Central Maine with her family, where she enjoys gardening, collecting geeky memorabilia, and watching other people cook. View all posts by R.J. Keller

3 responses to ““Six-Hundred Hours of a Life”

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